Clap…Be Amazed…Now Go Defend

What does it tell you when SC Magazine’s Best Security Company of the Year bases it’s business on helping organizations recover from all the failures of the layers of prevention and mitigation on which we focus so much of our time and money? The typical IT security environment today is focused on two things: prevention and vulnerability management. Problem is you can’t prevent what you don’t know is coming and with most preventative solutions in place today your best hope is that you’re not the first (or earliest) to see an attack and that whoever is can and will share that intel. Risk worth assuming? Are we better served with the Sisyphean task of continuous patch management than we would be were we to focus most of those resources (people and money) on early detection and response?

Whether you agree with these types of awards or not, Mandiant deserves the recognition. They’re a great company and group of people and are model givers to the Info Sec community which helps people like me do my job better. They’ve assembled some of the best talent in the business as well. All deserving reasons.

I’ll give you one more.

For all the money we spend in Info Sec trying to prevent attacks, and a lot is spent, what happens when an attack gets through? We know prevention is going to fail. Yes. Prevention WILL fail and regularly does. If you don’t have any level of network monitoring in place then you’re doing it wrong. And there’s no excuse for it. In fact, there’s no excuse for not leveraging the latest and greatest technologies available to mitigate attacks when the financial cost is moot and your security posture could be strengthened immensely. For larger organizations who already have commercial solutions in place, are you able to afford the extent of coverage required for maximum visibility? What if you could get that coverage without the lofty hardware and support costs?

How do you save money on network security monitoring? You open your eyes to the low cost potential of open source initiatives and brilliant minds eager to share, like a few of those that Mandiant has shepherded through the Info Sec world. Doug Burks (@DougBurks), of Mandiant, has provided one such solution with Security Onion, a network monitoring Linux distribution that is only limited by the hardware you have at your disposal on which to run it. And what’s even better? He’s made it so easy to setup and configure that even complete strangers to Linux can figure it out. If you know how to boot off of a DVD you’re in business. Need a deployed infrastructure? Setup one Security Onion host as a server and deploy others as sensors. Standalone works just as well. Heck, I run it in a virtual machine on my laptop and it’s the best host-based IPS money can buy…but doesn’t need to. I’m not kidding about how easy this is to deploy and if you take 20-30 minutes and watch one of Doug’s presentations (links available on the Security Onion site) demonstrating just how easy it is, you’ll thank me. Then you’ll show him thanks by downloading it.

When you look at the arsenal of monitoring tools that Security Onion brings to the table you’ll be even more amazed as you peel back the layers and get a handle on just how powerful the solution is.

You get Snort, the great open source intrusion detection/prevention system from Sourcefire (another incredible company; see my Razorback post then go download the new version). Maintaining Snort with Security Onion via PulledPork for signature management is a breeze and easily supports Snort (get thee an Oinkcode! ) and Emerging Threats signatures.

You get full packet capturing with Sourcefire’s Open Source Daemonlogger.

You get OSSEC, a host-based intrusion detection system, which helps you monitor your network security deployment out of the box and the capability to extend that detection to Windows, Linux, and MacOS via the OSSEC agents.

You get Bro IDS, an alternative approach to IDS that I’m just now learning myself and have been continually blown away by the visibility it provides. I hope to cover it more specifically in a future post, as educational resources for using Bro are a little scarce. It’s described as a network analysis framework and it comes preloaded with a few obvious examples that will give you an idea of what the framework can do. It collects basic connection data for every connection, http, ftp, syslog and SMTP data, SSL certificates (both known and the suspicious unknowns), SQL injection attacks, and more. It will continue to amaze you when when the framework reveals its capabilities with events like HTTP::Malware_Hash_Registry_Match, indicating a file has been downloaded, the file hashed and the hash matches a known malicious software hash in the Team Cymru Malware Hash Registry.

All that and more, packaged up nicely saving you all of the headaches of deploying a comprehensive network monitoring suite of Open Source solutions from scratch.

Once you start collecting data you’ll have the powers of Squil, Squert, and Snorby at your disposal for monitoring and analysis. If you prefer, you can also grab a copy of Splunk.which installs fairly painlessly on Security Onion. (Only issue I had was the default Splunk port was in use; I typically use port 81 without problems.)

Take a day. Install a Security Onion VM. Run some sample pcaps through it. See how easy it is to deploy and detect the activity. Now think how much better you might be able to defend with this kind of visibility at next to no cost (how many old servers are being retired and replaced with virtual machines? Reuse them!). Then with all the money you’ll be saving go hire some gifted local talent with dedication and passion to learning and an accepted understanding that they’ll always be a day behind. Do this and you’ve improved your overall security posture immensely and put yourself in a much better position to detect and respond to an incident. Even if you aren’t doing the responding! If the FBI shows up at your door, you’re going to need help. The data you would be collecting would be invaluable to resolving an incident efficiently and effectively.

Now do you start to see why I think Mandiant deserves Best Security Company recognition? And this is just one example. Have you looked at the free tools they offer? Have you ever heard of TaoSecurity Blog? Dustin Webber, the author of Snorby (although he’s with Tenable now I believe)? Their efforts with OpenIOC.org? Jamie Butler, who literally co-authered the book on rootkits? The latest is Michael Sikorski’s contributions with his new book Practical Malware Analysis accompanied by the release of FakeNet, a malware network analysis tool. The list goes on. They’re a company of talented people, providing tools and sharing knowledge to build stronger and more capable communities to build a safer Internet.

Any company like that deserves the title Best Security Company, especially when compared to companies who profit from you for solutions that you buy with theĀ  expectation that they will fail you at some point. Mandiant profits when those companies fail you. And then they (Mandiant’s family) turn around and give, yes give as in free, you a way to do a lot if not more than what you’re paying good money for, or aren’t paying for at all because you can’t afford it. They’re doing something about enabling small/medium businesses and personal networks to adopt affordable security approaches. They’re providing security practitioners with tools and technologies to perform better, defend more wisely and “find evil” more efficiently with less technical skill than was required 2 years ago. They’re doing it in their 9-5 jobs. They’re doing it as hobbyists. They’re doing it as caring volunteer citizens.

They should be recognized and thanked…

And you should go download Security Onion and start protecting your personal and professional assets…like now.

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